The Way it Is

dried-roses

If you were to sit in my dining room, you might think it strange that I have a dead plant.

But I think it is beautiful.

I haven’t been able to part with these dried roses. They do not mean death to me. Their papery petals and brittle leaves that crumble if touched are a symbol of fragility; their aged and faded flowers a reminder of the movement of time.

There will come a day when I will replace this plant that did not survive with a fresh and green and thriving one. But for now, I enjoy its loveliness just the way it is.

Flowers in the Dark

dark-rose

I bought some new house plants to replace the ones I’d killed.

Even though I know it probably will not last (if previous purchases of mini roses is any indication), I could not resist these roses. They are the colour of coral, a splash of colour in this beige season.

Besides, they make a great subject for photography.

One Flower

african-daisy

I thought I had killed it.

This beautiful flower I had bought to brighten my garden. I thought I had killed it with neglect.

I forgot to water it, deadhead it, give it sunlight. I bought the pot, set it out, and forgot about it. I was beginning to think I truly had a black thumb.

Last week, I transferred it to a new pot and gave it water. I did not have any hope or illusion that it would bloom again.

But it did. There is only one flower, but there is one.

For the Weeds

star-bright-edited

Right now my yard is more weeds than lawn.

Scraggly dandelions poke out amid the long grass and occasional thorn (ouch!). Rabbit flowers, as we called them when we were kids, are abundant. The bees are loving my yard right now!

It looks terrible.

But, first impressions aside, there is beauty there. Happy little daisies pop up here and there; buttercups lie low with their sunny yellow petals; even a lone tiger lily reaches out from the side yard. With my camera, I am able to capture many beautiful shots.

Maybe “weeds” are not so bad, after all.