Reflection of Me

reflection-of-me

I suppose this is what I look like, a lot of the time, a camera positioned in front of my face.

There was a broken piece of glass against an old shed the other day, and I had to capture it. I had intended to make a few compositions of the slivered shards and reflected light. When I stepped in front of it, it was myself that I saw. (Three times over!)

So I took a picture of me, instead.

Weekly Photography Challenge: Selfie

Self-Portrait-2

I’d much rather be behind the camera than in front of it.

This, mainly, is why I don’t take many selfies. I’d rather capture my children while they play, or the details of my life. It is much more comfortable to be the one taking the photos than the one having the photos taken.

This one (admittedly, one that was taken some time ago), I don’t mind so much. Probably because I’m hiding behind my camera.

A Sparkling New Camera

lens

I’ve been waiting awhile for this.

More than a year ago, I started looking at new cameras. It was time for an update.

Now, after much research and waiting, I have purchased a new digital SLR, and am (im)patiently waiting for the battery to charge so I can use it.

I did manage a few shots, like this one (notice the sparkles!), before it died.

I am now the proud owner of a Canon Rebel SL1 (the world’s smallest DSLR!).

Two Trees

two trees

There is a tree in our yard. Two trees, in fact. They grow together, wrapping their roots around each other and tricking the eye into thinking they are one tree until closer inspection.

They are two kinds of crab apples, their trunks so close they are like one.

Every season, they produce a new kind of pretty.

Blossoms and tiny leaves in spring, full and green in summer, bright orange and red in fall, and gray-black branches a contrast against winter snow.

And every season, I capture them with my camera.

Ten Ways to Enjoy the Little Things

flowerburst-edited

September is here. And with it, new activities, schedules, homework, packing lunches, and hectic mornings. In a small attempt to take the quiet moments of summer with me, I have compiled a list of things I have learned about appreciating the small details. With any luck, I will remember a few in the midst of rushing the kids from one commitment to the next. Here’s what I came up with:

Ten Ways to Enjoy the Little Things

1. Look for small details. There is beauty everywhere. The daisy poking through the sidewalk, the peeling paint on a door, the reflection of light in the teapot.
2. Close your eyes. Listen to every sound.
3. Pick up your pen. Write about everything, including the dust on the bookshelf and the dishes in the sink. There is a story there.
4. Go out with your camera. It helps to focus and be in the moment.
5. Be still. Stop rushing and notice the surroundings.
6. Go for a walk. Breathe deeply. Look and listen.
7. Read poetry. It celebrates the little things.
8. See the world through a child’s eyes. Everything is delightful to a toddler discovering the world.
9. Get up earlier than everyone else in the house. Listen to the quiet. Watch the sun come up. Savour the taste of coffee.
10. Turn off the computer, the tablets, the phones. What have you been missing?

Soft Evening Light

flowers-at-moms

There is a moment when the light is soft and quiet. The sun dips below the trees, taking its shadows with it.

It is my favourite time to explore with my camera.

Potted flowers become abstract art. Lines on leaves become visible patterns. Orange and red berries become brighter and more intense. The world transforms through my lens.

And I cannot capture enough.

Weekly Photography Challenge: Focus

leica

There is something very poetic and dreamy about shallow depth of field. Many of my photos are taken at f/2.8 for this reason.

This is my submission for this week’s challenge: “Focus” (http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/08/23/weekly-photo-challenge-focus/). This photo is all about focus – the camera, the lens, the focal point, and the depth of field.

It is also symbolic of my obsession with photography… Not only do I use my camera to focus on a subject, and manipulate f/stops to get the effect I’m looking for, but my camera helps me focus on the moment, too.